In Warranted Christian Belief (henceforth WCB), Alvin Plantinga examines the conditions under which theistic and Christian beliefs possess warrant—that which transforms true belief into knowledge. […] A believer could reason in this way, and perhaps some believers do in fact reason this way. Xtianity has to do with finding it unjustifiable based on evidence - like approaching the question of the truth of Xtianity like the truth of a scientific hypothesis. Plantinga deals first with the complaint that theistic or Christian belief is unjustified, which he interprets as the objection that theists or Christians are not conforming to their intellectual duties in believing in God or Christianity. About 20 years ago a startling new idea was aired by some philosophers associated with the Centre for Christian Studies at Calvin College. Refresh and try again. WCB, as its title suggests, is devoted to the application of Plantinga’s views on warrant to the consideration of the epistemic status of Christian belief. This is a fairly dense 500 pages of epistemology, theology, and general philosophy. Shelves: apologetics, epistemology, philosophy-of-religion. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. The rigorous and detailed discussion (extending to two type faces: standard for the rigorous, and small for the really rigorous) of the 508 pages of this massive book is enlivened by Plantinga’s ready wit and refreshing choice of examples—those familiar with Plantinga’s previous works will be pleased to see more examples taken from the author’s hobby of mountain-climbing and from his (distant) relative Feike, the Frisian. Hardcore Christian Philosophy. Reformed epistemology has reached its apogee in the publication of Alvin Plantinga’s magnum opus, Warranted Christian Belief (hereafter WCB). Although the author does a great job making the majority of the content accessible to the lay reader, he occasionally runs up against topics of irreducible complexity which can be hard to fully appreciate without a lot of effort and at least a little formal training in philosophy. Faith Without Reasons? That is what I love about Sandel's JUSTICE. Plantinga sets out in this book to answer the de jure objections to Christian faith which are arguments that, apart from whether Christianity is true or not (de facto objections), argue that Christian belief is unjustifiable, irrational or not intellectually respectable. I was not aware that it was the third part of a trilogy when I began the book and, considering the discussions of the first part of the book (concerning the process of the production of true beliefs), I am now really eager to go back and read the first two. As for specifically Christian belief, Plantinga claims on page 255 that, given the experiences that go with the testimony of the Holy Spirit, it would be dysfunctional not to form Christian beliefs, and presumably dysfunctional not to form them in the basic way, i.e., without (propositional) evidence or argument. Searching for a more challenging objection, Plantinga turns to external rationality, which he defines (246) as proper function of the cognitive faculties ‘upstream’ from experience, i.e., with respect to formation of the right kind of experience (112). Plantinga then turns to the defence of Christian belief. Advanced: admittedly this was a pretty difficult read for me, but I felt like the topic was too important to give up on. Plantinga concedes that there is a prima facie plausible objection to theistic or Christian belief if one interprets the de jure objection as alleging that theistic or Christian belief is externally irrational. This implies that those who do believe on the basis of arguments and (propositional) reasons would be warranted in believing non-basically and simultaneously unwarranted in their failure to believe basically. Three main points worth highlighting: Plantinga sets out in this book to answer the de jure objections to Christian faith which are arguments that, apart from whether Christianity is true or not (de facto objections), argue that Christian belief is unjustifiable, irrational or not intellectually respectable. The distinction between the “de jure (is it rational? But in the model it goes differently. Start by marking “Warranted Christian Belief” as Want to Read: Error rating book. This conclusion is important for at least two reasons: i) it gives an advantage to theism over its competitors, for, even if true, we are not warranted in believing in naturalism (so Plantinga argues), and ii) the role of philosophy with respect to religion is to make theistic belief rationally acceptable (according to Plantinga, that is all that philosophy can do in this domain).

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